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9 O'Clock Gun


The 9 O'Clock Gun is a cannon located in Vancouver, British Columbia that is shot every night at 21:00 (9 p.m.) PT.  The gun is a 12-pound muzzle-loaded naval cannon, cast in Woolwich, England in 1816.  Seventy-eight years later, in about 1894, it was brought to Stanley Park by the Department of Marine and Fisheries to warn fishermen of the 18:00 Sunday close of fishing. On October 15, 1898 the gun was fired for the first time in Stanley Park at noon.

 

The 21:00 firing was later established as a time signal for the general population and to allow the chronometers of ships in port to be accurately set. The Brockton Point lighthouse keeper, William D. Jones, originally detonated a stick of dynamite over the water until the cannon was installed. The cannon is now activated automatically with an electronic trigger which was installed by the Parks Board electrical department. It is still loaded daily with a black powder charge. The fluorescent lights illuminating the gun from overhead go out exactly ten seconds before it fires, and turn back on a few seconds afterward.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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The Drop (sculpture)


The Drop is a steel sculpture resembling a raindrop by the group of German artists known as Inges Idee, located at Bon Voyage Plaza in the Coal Harbour neighborhood of downtown Vancouver. The 65-foot (20 m) tall piece is covered with Styrofoam and blue polyurethane.


According to Inges Idee, the sculpture is "an homage to the power of nature" and represents "the relationship and outlook towards the water that surrounds us." The Drop was commissioned as part of the 2009 Vancouver Convention Centre Art Project and is owned by BC Pavco.


Source: Wikipedia

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Whytecliff Park


Originally named White Cliff City, which opened in 1909.  Whytecliff Park is located near West Vancouver's Horseshoe Bay Neighbourhood.  The park is currently home to more than 200 marine animal species and is the first Marine Protected Area in Canada. Sea lions can be seen sunbathing on the beach during summer.

 

The park is perfect for family barbeques with ample space and public washrooms. The park also offers great hiking, swimming and is a popular location for underwater diving.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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Harrison Hot Springs Water Park


If you're looking for a place that's fun for the the whole family and need to cool down then Harrison Lake and Harrison River is the place to go!  Enjoy many water activites like fishing, boating, windsurfing, swimming, canoeing, kayaking, water skiing, or just soaking in the hot springs pool, Harrison is all about clear, clean, glacier pure water.

 

Souce: Tourism Harrison

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The Stawamus Chief


Officially called Stawamus Chief Mountain, “The Chief” is the most recognized mountain near Squamish, BC.  This granite dome is often claimed to be the "second largest granite monolith in the world."   Canada's big-wall rock-climbing mecca, attracting keen rock climbers from around the world every summer.  The Chief’s three summits offer rewarding views of Howe Sound, Squamish town site and surrounding mountains. This park has opportunities for camping, hiking, rock climbing and scenic viewing atop the Chief.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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Grouse Grind

 

The Grouse Grind is Vancouver, BC’s most popular trail.  Located in North Vancouver at the base of Grouse Mountain, the trail is so widely used that wooden steps were built on most of the trail to prevent erosion from further use.  This trail is not for the faint of heart, there are 2,830 stairs and has an elevation gain of 2,800 feet!

 

Reach the top of the peak and you can successfully say that you completed “The Grind”.  Then you can turn around and hike back down the mountain… just kidding!  At the top you can purchase snacks, shop, hike some more, or have lunch.  You can also purchase your ticket for the Gondola ride down the mountain.

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Britannia Mine Museum


For almost 70 years during the 1920s and 1930s, Britannia Mine was an important source of copper ore and was one of the largest mining operations in Canada.  The museum is the site of Mill 3, also called the Concentrator and in 1987 was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada. 

 

Fun for the whole family, learn about the history of Britannia Mine and explore the grounds with underground train tours and gold panning demonstrations. 

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The Butchart Gardens


When visiting Victoria, British Columbia; The Butchart Gardens is one attraction that you don’t want to miss!  The gardens receive close to 1 million visitors each year and is recognized as one of the world’s premier show gardens.  The gardens have been designated a National Historic Site of Canada due to their international renown.

 

The gardens offers exquisite views and a spectacular floral display.  Started in 1904 by Jennie Butchart, the gardens feature Sunken and Japanese gardens in addition to local flora.  The Butchart Gardens are wonderful to visit at any time of the year.


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Capilano Suspension Bridge

 

Capilano Suspension Bridge Park offers an all-encompassing BC experience. The 450 ft (137m) long, 230 ft (70m) high Capilano Suspension Bridge has excited guests since 1889.  The Vancouver landmark is rich in culture, history and nature.

 

The first location of its kind in North America, the park also features Treetops Adventures, ecotours, award-winning gardens and nature trails.  Observe First Nations totem posts which are North America's largest private collection, period decor and traditional First Nations costumes.  Wander through exhibits displaying the park's history as well as enjoy the surrounding temperate rain forest.  Guests also can witness a First Nations performance, showcasing their traditional Regalia (ceremonial dress), masks, dancing and storytelling.

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Stanley Park Seawall

 

The scenic Seawall is one of the most famous parks in the world and the most famous park in Vancouver. 

 

The park was created in 1917, its main purpose was to help stave off erosion and took 60 years to complete. 

 

The Seawall loops around Stanley Park and is 8.8 km, fully paved with gorgeous views of the city, northern mountains, and Lion's Gate Bridge. 

 

Perfect for walking, biking, rollerblading and sight-seeing!

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